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Georgia Tech researchers included code on their Jekyll app that allowed them to monitor Apple’s review process. They discovered that the app had only been tested for “a few seconds” before it was allowed to go live on the iOS App Store. Source: Forbes

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In January, the Georgia Institute of Technology plans to offer a master’s degree in computer science through massive open online courses for a fraction of the on-campus cost, a first for an elite institution. If it even approaches its goal of drawing thousands of students, it could signal a change to the landscape of higher education. Source: The New York Times

 

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The malware designers, a research team from Georgia Institute of Technology's Information Security Center (GTISC), were able to monitor their app during the review: they discovered Apple ran the app for only a few seconds, before ultimately approving it. Source: IT News

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 In "Jekyll on iOS: When Benign Apps Become Evil", a paper presented at the Usenix Security '13 conference, Tielei Wang, Kangjie Lu, Long Lu, Simon Chung, and Wenke Lee describe how they were able to create apps that can be exploited remotely through program paths that did not exist during the app review process. Source: Information Week

 

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Researchers from Georgia Tech have determined that the Apple’s review process runs at least some programs for only a few seconds before giving the green light, which wasn’t long enough for Apple to notice that an app that purported to offer news from Georgia Tech contained code fragments that later assembled themselves into a malicious digital creature. Source: Technology Review

 

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 “I would never plug my phone into a public charger,” says Billy Lau, a research scientist at the Georgia Institute of Technology who led the Black Hat demo. “You don’t know whether you are just charging your phone or if something else is going on. Source: New York Daily News

 

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Georgia Tech Information Security Center researchers presented how they were able to hack into an iPhone using its charger at a briefing on Wednesday at the Black Hat cybersecurity conference in Las Vegas. Source: CBS News

 

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Richard Demillo, director of the Center for 21st Century Universities at the Georgia Institute of Technology, put it another way: The Great Recession exposed structural flaws in higher education. The system simply cost too much and accomplished too little. Source: Associated Press

 

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Georgia Tech Information Security Center researchers will reveal how they were able to hack into an iPhone using its charger at a Black Hat briefing on Wednesday. Source: CBS News

 

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At the Black Hat security conference in Las Vegas Wednesday, three Georgia Tech security researchers carried out a demonstration for reporters showing just how easily they could compromise an iPhone 5 using a malicious charger built with a three-inch square, $45 computer known as a BeagleBoard. Source: Forbes

 

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