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Richard A. DeMillo (Comp Sci), director of the Center for 21st Century Universities, talks to The Washington Post about Georgia Tech's involvement with Coursera. Source: The Washington Post

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Forbes named the College of Computing at Georgia Tech one of the top ten colleges for your bank account with the average starting salary for graduates being $60,387. Source: Forbes

 

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Intel recently announced that Vishal Gupta, a PhD student of Karsten Schwan (Comp Sci), and Aparna Chandramowlishwaran, a PhD student of Rich Vuduc (Comp Sci & Engineering), are recipients of 2012 Intel Fellowships.

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In collaboration with the Georgia Tech Information Security Center (GTISC), Damballa announced the discovery of a new iteration of TDSS/TDL4 malware that is utilizing domain generation algorithm (DGA)-based communication for command-and-control (C&C). Source: MarketWatch

 

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Atlanta Web security firm Damballa Inc. has raised $15 million — capital it will use to fuel an expansion in Europe and Asia. Paul Royal (Comp Sci) talks about the Georgia Tech spinoff that has developed technology that sniffs out dangerous software. Source: Atlanta Business Chronicle

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Flashpoint Director and Developer, Merrick Furst (Comp Sci) will travel to Israel to assist startups participating in Microsoft’s accelerator, while accelerator participants will spend a month in Georgia, and Flashpoint startups travelling over to Israel. Source: The Next Web

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Students consider the schools on this list as the most technologically advanced in the U.S.  The College of Computing is a pioneer in the “new face of computing” establishing a more diversified engineering discipline. Source: Mashable

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Professors Wenke Lee and Keith Edwards have been named directors of the Georgia Tech Information Security Center (GTISC) and the GVU Center, respectively, College of Computing Dean Zvi Galil announced Aug. 1. Source: Office of Communications

Computer-generated characters have become so lifelike in appearance and movement that the line separating reality is almost imperceptible at times. But while bipeds and quadrupeds have reigned supreme in CG animation, attempts to create and control their skeleton-free cousins using similar techniques has proved time-consuming and laborious.

Georgia Tech researchers have found a possible solution to this challenge by developing a way to simulate and control movement of computer-generated characters without a skeletal structure, anything from starfish and earthworms to an elephant’s trunk or the human tongue.

Georgia Tech is one of a dozen major research universities that has signed an agreement with Coursera to put their web-based courses online. The Director of the Center for 21st Century Universities, Rich A. DeMillo (Comp Sci), discusses the potential for this major experiment in education. Source: The New York Times

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