News

What if a hacker could log every key you typed on your PC by placing a cellphone nearby? Patrick Traynor (Computer Science) and colleagues have shown how this is possible using the latest generation of smartphones. Source: Times of India

Visit Website

If you're looking for a reason (other than price) to buy an iPhone 3GS as opposed to an iPhone 4, here's one: according to Patrick Traynor (Computer Science) it's possible that malware on an iPhone 4 can detect and deduce what someone is typing on a nearby keyboard. Source: Gizmag

Visit Website

Higher education institutions that spend millions of dollars building sports teams of virtually professional standard are symptomatic, says Rich DeMillo (Computer Science), of many American universities that have become too focused on inappropriate and often unwinnable competitions. Source: Times Higher Education

Visit Website

Similar keylogging methods have been developed using a smartphone's microphone, but malware masquerading as a legitimate app can usually access a smartphone's accelerometer without tripping built-in security features, according to researcher Patrick Traynor (Computer Science) and colleagues. Source: Ars Technica

Visit Website

Did you know your smartphone's accelerometer can be used to steal keystrokes from a nearby keyboard? Using an iPhone 4, Patrick Traynor (Computer Science) and colleagues have managed to capture complete sentences with up to 80 percent accuracy. Source: PC World

Visit Website

By exploiting smartphones' accelerometers, hackers could detect and even decipher words typed on a nearby keyboard, says research by Patrick Traynor (Computer Science) and colleagues. Source: Network World

Visit Website

Smartphone users, beware! Hackers could use your mobile to find out what you are typing on a nearby computer at your workplace, says Patrick Traynor (Computer Science). Source: Zee News

Visit Website

Patrick Traynor (Computer Science) says seemingly innocuous apps, once downloaded, could contain malware that would use smartphones' accelerometers to spy on nearby keyboards. Source: Wired

Visit Website

The danger of smartphone accelerometers as a cyber-attack vector, says Patrick Traynor (Computer Science), is that applications typically can gain access to a phone's accelerometer without user approval. Source: Science a Go Go

Visit Website

Georgia Tech researchers led by Patrick Traynor (Computer Science) have discovered how smartphones' accelerometers on smart phones can collect meaningful data by sensing nearby keyboard vibrations. Source: Government Computer News

Visit Website